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What are some types of Texas child conservatorships?

On Behalf of | Sep 2, 2021 | child custody | 1 comment

The Texas government designs child custody laws so that the parent who desires custody must obtain it legally through the court system once a divorce is complete. TexasLawHelp notes that in Texas, child custody is also known as conservatorship, and without such an order, neither parent can exercise legal control over how often or when visitation takes place.

Parents who want to pursue a legal course for child custody may want to understand the different types of conservatorship in Texas so they can choose the proper course and documents before proceeding.

Sole managing conservator

A parent who believes his or her ex-spouse is a danger to the children of that union may want to file as a sole manage conservator. Under the guidelines of this conservatorship, only one parent has custody because the other parent may either live a violent lifestyle, engage in drug use or has a history of abuse with the children. Once a parent has this title under Texas law, he or she alone makes decisions about the children’s welfare.

Joint managing conservators

This type of Texas child custody allows both parents to make decisions about their children together. Once a divorce completes, a judge will set a possession order and grant visitation rights for each parent; however, one parent, known as the custodial parent, usually has more of the decision-making power.

A judge that oversees any Texas conservatorship case will probably consider a variety of factors before making any final choices about which parent will have the right to make the majority of decisions. A parent seeking sole conservatorship may want to provide the court as much proof as possible as to why it should limit the other parent’s visitation and decision-making rights.

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