If you plan to get divorced there are likely many factors which contributed to the demise of your relationship. Maybe you and your spouse drifted apart. You might have contrasting ideas for handling your finances. And if children are involved, you almost certainly have different parenting styles. But regardless of the differences between you and your spouse, you may be wise to consider whether you truly have reason to try to keep him or her from your children.

You must keep the best interests of your children in mind when it comes to determining child custody, or conservatorship, arrangements. Many parents want to fight for sole custody. However, in most instances, children benefit from having their mother and their father involved in their lives.

What studies suggest about parental involvement

Unless there are specific concerns about your children’s safety while being in the care of their other parent, Texas courts presume both parents should share conservatorship. But in a traditional divorce, what are the benefits to interacting with each parent?

  • Mothers – That mothers are innately gentle caregivers of children likely comes as no surprise. In general, moms encourage collaboration and equity, while offering security. And while mothers might discipline children often, providing behavioral guidance, there are plenty of things a child can learn from his or her dad.
  • Fathers – When a child is frustrated, mothers are often quicker to react than fathers. As a result, fathers can help children increase their problem-solving capabilities. In their discipline, dads are more likely to stress fairness. And despite their natural inclination to protect their own, a dad’s seemingly dangerous style of playing encourages competition and independence in children.

As you determine the terms of your divorce, be sure to consider the needs of your children. In addition to the struggles you face as your marriage ends, the change in your marital relationship will probably also be difficult for your kids as they adjust to their new normal. However, maintaining relationships with both of their parents can be part of what helps them continue to learn and grow.